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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the president believes he has higher ground under this. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public opinion on their side. if you talk to people in washington there is a sense that at the last minute reason will prevail. there is a not a lot of optimism. you know this and my colleagues k
the piper. the question is the creation of washington of the fiscal cliff or a creation of your investors and bondholders across the world that look at you in the same light as europe some day. we all know that day isn't here. this is a lesson for the republican party, and i think it's a lesson we should all take. instead of when we look at all these programs, mark, where are we going to make cuts and how terrible is this going to be, we need to judge our concern and empat empathy, not by the money, something marco rubio and paul ryan talked about, by the outcomes, not how much we spend but what we get out of it. look at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopholes. >> how quickly will all this felt? say they have a deal three weeks into the new year, that doesn't help you if you're trying to run an agency budget because you've got to make plans for january 2nd. >
. >> christine lagarde, the fiscal cliff, how concerned are they about the ramifications? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it appears to be the case there was more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed and there is more concerned about the fiscal cliff. they asked about a resolution. >> what could the impact speed? we are looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1% less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in recession, would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not need that because recovery is fragile.
cliff and what it's doing for hiring, or the lack of it. and speaking of the fiscal cliff, let me say to washington, no vacation without legislation. we will be virtually monitoring airports to see which legislators are leaving town now that the vacation is supposed to begin. you know what? if we don't have a deal by this vacation, or a pledge not to go away, then the odds go to -- down to 50-50 that we'll get one before the end of the year. and then we may only get one when people look at their take-home play and have a collective bout of nausea from a recognition that there was a fiscal cliff all along and we were just pushed over it. that's how much your paycheck's going to shrink. here's the bottom line. let's hope for the best that our politicians move in the right direction. something we can see as early as sunday morning when they appear on the major political talk shows like "meet the press." but we'll be preparing for the worst. >> the house of pain! >> that our lawmakers go home for the holidays, meaning we will likely go over the cliff and nothing will be done about it unti
] >> tomorrow we will talk about the latest out of the fiscal cliff negotiations. then a look at the lobbying going around the fiscal of negotiations by clients in washington. our guest is an up polymer. later, the response from the community. >> this week the new chairman of the governors' association. he talks about the so-called fiscal cliff, affordable care act and the groundwork for the elections. what newsmakers live sunday it 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> it was estimated that the land of hiroshima would cause our fishermen to be killed. >> as harry truman's grandson, i'd choose to honor both -- the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific end of the door girl like sadoku who died as the result of an atomic bombing. it is unimaginable what that must have been like to be close to that of where that fireball originated. >> follow him on his journey to hiroshima sunday on c-span3. he joins us to discuss meetings with survivors and the inspiration for his trip at 9:00 p.m. eastern. >> next, we will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and
a discussion on the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations and the impact on unemployment insurance. from "washington journal" this is 40 minutes. host: we continue our look at unemployment insurance and its role in the fiscal clift debate, we are joined by michael tanner and josh bivens. mr. michael tanner, if you had your way in these discussions, where what unemployment insurance end up at the end of the day? guest: i think the emergency extension should fade away and we should go back to the 46 weeks that we have been at, the 26 weeks of traditional employment, and extended benefits in states that have higher unemployment rates. you start with the fact that unemployment insurance itself, when you extended for a long times as questionable value. we know it leads to an increase in the on and -- unemployment rate. that is dubious enough, but when you factor in that we will deficit finance this and slow economic growth overall, destroying jobs of the same time we pay people for being unemployed, a thing that creates a problem. host: how much money do we save if we do not extend emergency
and not spending cuts in averting the fiscal cliff. >> the facts are that at this point the 39.6% does produce the revenue. the differentiation between the 39 pin 6% and the 28% that the president has for limitation or deductions creates a great deal of money as well. >> one conservative commentator suggested the out come of the fiscal talks won't be the end of the world. >> we will have taxes which are roughly the same as they were underon. we did fine in that. we will do fine. >> the question is whether these negotiations will lead to making other tough choices such as washington getting a handle on the growth of government. if not the european example seems to suggest huge fiscal trouble coming to our shores as well. mike emmanuel, fox news. >>> here is a doozie of a story. a baby mix up at a minneapolis hospital results in a new mother breastfeeding another woman's baby. i told you it was a doozie. the woman given the wrong infant realized that something was not right. >> when they brought cody she thought to herself it didn't look like her other baby. but her husband reassured her, and sh
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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